Monday, January 9, 2012

Surf anonymous with Proxychains (Ubuntu)

There is a bunch of apps that switch proxies for you but I found this one to work the best for me. What does it do? Basically, it automatically switches between proxies you listed, which can make it hard to trace you back. Some even consider using this on their jobs, to access content they would not be able to, because of their company policies.
It supports HTTP, socks4 and socks5 servers which can be chained together.

Lets get started, shall we?
First of all, you will (probably) need to add a source to your apt list. Backtrack repo has proxychains, so we will be adding it to our list. You can always remove the added lines later on, or put a comment before them.
You can do that by editing the file /etc/apt/sources.list with gedit/nano/vi(m). Be sure to use sudo!

eg.: sudo nano /etc/apt/sources.list

Scroll down to the end of file and add the following:

## Backtrack
deb http://all.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution main microverse non-free testing
deb http://32.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution main microverse non-free testing
#deb http://64.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution main microverse non-free testing
deb http://source.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution main microverse non-free testing

*Note, as you can see i have commented the 64.repository, as I use a 32bit system.
Choose the one that will work for you.

Save & close the file and then run the following in your Terminal:

sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install proxychains

When proxychains is successfully installed, it is time for configuration.
Nano/vi(m)/gedit this file: /etc/proxychains.conf.

eg.: sudo nano /etc/proxychains.conf

There will be a bunch of information here, take your time and read it if you wish.
If you scroll down the file, you will notice nearly everything is commented (#), it is important not to mess with comments too much. Common logic applies - comment stuff that is not needed and uncomment that, which is needed.
You have three possible options (leave one of them uncommented):
-dynamic_chain which takes the proxies in the order you added them and skips dead proxies.
-random_chain which takes the proxies from the list in a random order.
-strict_chain which takes the proxies in the order you added them like the dynamic_chain except this chaining option does not skip dead proxies.

*Note that if you select random_chain you will also need to setup the chain_len parameter.

I think dynamic and random chains are the most useful, but I will leave that to you. Scrolling further down will show you the following:

[ProxyList]
# add proxy here ...
# meanwile
# defaults set to "tor"
socks4     127.0.0.1 9050

Here is the place you place your proxies. Be sure to leave that line with your localhost, and just add proxies bellow it.

Here is an example of three added proxies (*Note that they are fictional, and also notice what i put before the IP - socks4/5 or HTTP):

[ProxyList]
# add proxy here ...
# meanwile
# defaults set to "tor"
socks4     127.0.0.1 9050
socks4    131.1.1.1 1111
socks5    130.1.1.1 2121
HTTP    127.1.1.1 1080

You can get a free list of proxies on Google. Just search something similar to "free socks4 proxy". Naturally, do not forget to enter port (which is the number right after the IP). Althought free proxies are most likely honeypots, either put there by the Government or some malicious people stealing creds, it will do for this test (as long as you do not log in your PayPal/Gmail or do some illegal stuff :P).

When you have your proxies saved in configuration file, test them with the following command in the Terminal:

proxyresolv www.google.com

You can then type the following to start browsing with your proxy:

proxychains firefox

(*Note, this starts the web-browser Firefox. You could put here Chrome, Opera, or even telnet or ssh.)

Even adding a website works:

proxychains firefox www.whatsmyip.org

Be sure not to close your Terminal;  within it you can see, how is your connection working out. Also, putting too many proxies (especially public ones) will make your surfing extremely slow. Surfing dynamic websites will take ages. Enjoy your anonimity! :->)

7 comments:

  1. Windows user here.I had ubuntu some time ago but switching between systems for play is annoying.

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  2. I got a list oh secure html proxies, want?
    about 400 work

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  3. Kompot, yeah that is annoying. Dual boot saves the day for me :)

    CodingAndHacking,
    html proxy? Maybe you mean PHP web proxy? I tend to avoid those and rather use VPN's or my own made proxy for personal use :)

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  4. Nice that's pretty neat I love using ubuntu

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  5. Nice share. If I ever use ubuntu again, I'll remember this.

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  6. Very useful :) I will keep this in mind next time I dual boot..

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